The Unknown Movies

Letters are arranged from newest to oldest.

To contact The Unknown Movies, click this link


May 19, 2017

Hello,

It may be hard to believe, but House of the Long Shadows is the 13th adaptation of Earl Derr Bigger's novel Seven Keys to Baldpate (1913).  Twice on Broadway with actor/playwright George M. Cohan; seven motion pictures (three silent, four with sound); two radio adaptions; and two television productions.

Cohan deliberately made the stage play "old fashioned" in 1913, and that sensibility stuck with it ever since.  Golan and Globus probably OKed the production because by 1983 it was in public domain and wouldn't have to pay royalties.

So it is no surprise that a copy of a copy (of a copy, etc.) fails to catch fire.

Thanks for the enjoyment your web page has brought me,

Bill Culbertson


April 25, 2017

Enjoyed your Riverbend review. I agree, Steve James was an underrated presence. He was excellent in movies like The Exterminator and To Live and Die in LA as well. Someone ripped a VHS copy of Riverbend and put it out on YouTube. Hopefully it will make it to a legit DVD/blu ray release one day but in the meantime here it is in all its haggard glory:

https://youtu.be/Pk0kk39Iiew

Best,

Charles


March 20, 2017

[re: An Enemy Of The People]

This movie was broadcast on Channel 4 in the UK in or around 1985. The review on Ceefax (which might still be available) said that although the movie and most of the other actors were stiff, McQueen was excellent. I watched it and entirely agreed. I still remember the way he delivered his lines, the whole body acting, the conviction of his inflections in delivery.

I have little interest in McQueen the action star, and feel this movie is unjustly overlooked because it is too much of a challenge to people's expectations, and therefore prejudices. Just like McQueen's character in the film! For that reason alone it deserves wider release - it could actually help create the world based on truth Dr. Stockmann fights for in the film!

Rumwold Leigh


February 27, 2017

Thanks for your entertaining review of the film Disk-O-Tek Holiday (1966). Though I'm not sure when you initially published your review -and am aware content online has expanded exponentially- please be advised that, according to Discogs.com, the once-unknown Casey Paxton went on to become legendary (imho) disco-era artist D.C. La Rue.

Danny de San Francisco


February 22, 2017

[re: The Time Crystal]

Hi Greywizard,

I've been enjoying your reviews.  I've even seen a few of these movies myself.  Some of my favorite obscure films are: Deathstalker II, Raiders of the Sun, and Expect to Die.

I used to see this movie on local UHF tv regularly, and it might be right up your alley: http://m.imdb.com/title/tt0083198/

On my station KBHK 44 it aired as Tut and Tuttle. It's a made-for-TV children's fantasy adventure where a 1980's boy goes to ancient Egypt and helps young Tut and his sister fend off a coup.  Points of interest include actors Robbie Rist, Jo Ann Worley and Vic Tayback, and director Ron Howard in his early days as a director. I remember a magic crystal, a football helmet, a lot of sand, and Tut's sister pensively addressing the main character "Bobby Tuttle."  I don't know how "unknown" you would consider it, but it popped into my head recently and a few googles later I tracked it down. Haven't seen it in at least 20 years, and I probably never saw the entire thing. Fun memories though!

Jax Crawford


November 1, 2016

[re: Death Riders]

Every once in a while I get curious about my past and punch in "Death Riders" on whatever search engine I happen to be enamored with at the time to see if anyone is aware of the Death Riders Motorcycle Thrill Show of which I was a member for 6 years.  Sitting here at work this morning, I got curious and found your review of the Death Riders movie and found it to be fascinating.  I do agree with on one point in particular, a point I had when the movie was released; why did we do what we did?

You're right, the movie never really explored that.  For me, It was that I was going to break the world's record for distance on a motorcycle and become so rich and famous that I would do only 4 major shows a year, as opposed to the 60 or 70 shows we did in 4 months out of the year.  In trying to book shows, no one would take me seriously even though I had built my own ramps, had a good bike and leathers (actually, canvass at the time, I was a vegan) but only 18 so no one would care to take me seriously.  Ended up with Floyd who turned out to be a really great guy, a father figure for me and for that matter, all of us in the show. 

Floyd and the show gave me an experience that would require a book to describe so I will leave the details to imagination right now but offer that it did help groom my character for the rest of my life.  I joined the Marines after the show where I got  technical training, did well in leaving the Marines after 4 years at the rank of Sargent and went on to a successful career in medical devices.  Danny became an owner/operator over-the-road trucker, his big brother Floyd Jr. owned a number of doughnut shops in Danville, Cheese (Ron) ran his own plumbing company, Steve is a retired cop for Danville as of a few years ago, Larry hooked up with Hollywood from our movie experience and became an audio expert - I see his name pop up in movie credits from time to time, Rusty, our clown, passed away a couple years ago.

I found your review fascinating in that I gave me somewhat of insight to your character and how you perceived our movie which takes it to a personal level.  My reaction was, "Wow, a real person actually watched our movie, scene by scene and was interested in that part of our lives".  Now it will be difficult to focus on work without thinking of this time of my life.  Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts on the Death Riders.

Joe Byars


August 23, 2016

[re: Once In A Blue Moon (1995)]

Have a copy of Kenny and Co. and thought it was fantastic. Their '70ish translated pretty much much to my '77 in Canada. Only grade 2 at the time, but did encapsulate that time (looking at the older dudes that were way cooler than me). Just want to bring up a Canadian one that is probably of the same calibre, just with a twist of humour, Canadiana, and chicken that comes in a bucket (delicacy at the time)...Movie hard as hell to find, but heartwarmingly obscure... Just FYI

Terry


August 12, 2016

Hi there!

I've been a long, long time fan silent admirer of your site since at least '05. I went from high school through college reading your site and I loved the unique perspective you brought to these "Unknown" movies. I want you to know, your site has led me to [At Least] 3 movies that I absolutely love with all my heart. Without The Unknown Movies, I wouldn't have come across (and blind bought) Emperor of the North (Pole), Sonny Boy, & Strange Shadows in an Empty Room. Also, I've got a huge fondness for PM entertainment movies now-my heart skipped a beat when I purchased the Robert Patrick movie Zero Tolerance and saw that familiar logo!

Anyway, keep up the good work, if I may be so bold as to suggest some, I'd love to see some more spaghetti westerns like Mannaja, or Massacre Time.

Keep upholding those REAL movies!

Ross McClintock

Thank you very much for writing in, Ross! I'll be reviewing a spaghetti western in a few weeks, and I'll certainly review more in the future. And don't worry - I'll continue to tell readers what real movies are!


July 16, 2016

[re: Operation Daybreak]

Thank you! You answered an ancient whats-that-movie question of mine. I googled my way to your review of Goliath Awaits. I remembered the mutual suicide in a flooding church basement. And Nazis. But that was it.

Bob Stein

Glad to be of help!


May 4, 2016

I enjoyed your review of Valdez Is Coming and would like to add a thing or two...

This film is, in many ways, an homage to Hombre. Here's why I think so...

Hector Elizondo, an actual blue-eyed Latino in a role that was seemingly written in just for him and which mirrors the role of the Vaquero in Hombre, which was, as I'm sure you know, played to perfection by Frank Silvera. His money scene is a veritable re-write of the scene in Hombre where Silvera climbs the hill to parlay with Newman, right down to the playful wave of the hand.

The attitude that Segundo takes at the end toward shooting Valdez (he refuses) is, again, a rewrite of the final scene in the mining cabin in Hombre...."She's not my woman." It explains both the macho attitude toward fighting for your own woman (the men in both films who should, don't) as well as the secondary status of women in general in these films.

In both fils the hero is being chased because he has something of value to the bad-guy...money&water in Hombre...a woman in Valdez.

Finally, both films are about the expected role and behavior of Latinos in a White West. In Hombre, Mendez lectures Hombre on knowing his place and lives a life of servitude himself, as if it were the natural way of things. In Valdez, both Valdez and the Silvera character show this same deference and nod at their acceptance of it. It is this understanding of power that keeps Valdez so low-key until he shows out.

Of course, this is further shown by the addition in both films of an even lower caste, Apaches and, in Valdez, Blacks.

Just my two cents...good review.

Gibbons

Thanks for writing in with those observations. I think a big reason the two movies are similar are because they are both based on novels written by the same author (Elmore Leonard).


April 23, 2016

[re: The Phantom Kid]

I'm  pretty sure the reason there were any musical numbers at all in this  film was because it's basically a follow-the-leader to Bugsy Malone.  It's possible there were more numbers (not having seen the film, I can't say) that were edited out for pacing and/or low quality.

Brandi

You may be right. That could explain why there was more than one director on the movie.


January 12, 2016

Longtime (early 2000s) reader here; love to catch up on new reviews every couple of months. Thought you would get a kick out of this excellent article on the rise and fall of PM Entertainment.

Cheers,

Austin


December 29, 2015

[re: The Man With One Red Shoe]

The fact is that the French sense of humour is so different from that of the English-speaking world - they think Jerry Lewis is a genius, for goodness sake! - that any attempt to translate a French comedy is doomed to fail.  When they say "the French, they are a funny race", they don't mean "funny ha ha".  From what I've seen of French comedies, they like slapstick a great deal, but have no real sense of the ridiculous.
 
When I was in college, I saw a production of Jean-Paul Sartre's The Respectable Prostitute which was played as a jolly farce, and was pretty darn funny.  Sartre, of course, didn't intend it to be a comedy.  French philosphers aways take themselves very seriously. And of course they can never just do something, they have to philosophize about it.  Sartre's philosophy can be summed up as "Nothing matters, so why bother ?"  As in, why bother thinking about Existentalism ? 
 
I have seen both the French Cage Aux Folles and the American Birdcage, and the French one is much funnier IMO.
 
Anyway, I don't care for Hollywood's habit of making remakes of foreign films.  If I was interested, I see the original, as I did with Girl With The Dragon Tattoo,  a Swedish writer's story about Swedish people, set in Sweden - I think a Swedish film is more likely to understand the characters.  Know what ? If you keep typing the word 'Swedish' it begins to look really odd

Sandra


December 29, 2015

I stumbled on your great site while trying to solve a little puzzle.

There's a pop band here in Canada called Stars that I'm fond of, and their lead singer did a small solo album a few years ago.  It begins with a cheesy voice-over "It began one stormy night in the Aleutian Islands..."  and I was curiously where it came from.  With a bit of Google-fu, I ended up at your review of The Golden Seal.

It turns out that singer Torq Campbell was the young star of this film. 

And this solo side project is called "Dead Child Star" - which strikes me as both poetic and a bit tragic, especially in the context of his recurring themes of holding on to one's innocence and playfulness.

Anyway, neat site - I look forward to digging to find some interesting gems in your trove of reviews!

Hope you had a Merry Christmas, and have a great 2016!

Cheers,

Gareth


October 7, 2015

Hello again!

A long time ago, I read your review of Rituals and as I result, I developed this weird fascination with the movie (probably because it sounded very creepy as well as impossible to find). It wasn't until very recently that I managed to buy my own copy and I have to say, it was everything I hoped it would be. It's a movie that manages to stay tense throughout most of its running time (especially the last couple of scenes) and even the severed head managed to throw me off guard when it appeared, despite that scene being in the trailer.

Anyway, I just wanted to say thanks for introducing me to such a great movie!

Alissa

P.S. Nice to see some appreciation for Golgo 13 as well! He's very underrated in North America, which is a complete shame.


August 8, 2015

[re: Little Ninjas]

Hello.  I used to love this movie and watch it all the time as a kid (27 now). I just finished re-watching it, and after having that "did I really just sit through this?" reaction I decided to look it up online to see if anyone had an opinion on the movie.  I didn't expect to find anything let alone a full in-depth review that pretty much described it to a tee.  Anyway I just wanted to say I enjoyed reading your review and it gave me a really good laugh, and I needed one, so thanks. :)

Raul Hernandez


July 27, 2015

[re: Gargoyles]

I'm fond of that movie myself. It's one of the few 70s tv movies that still show up occasionally and are worth another look when they do.  Another is The Norliss Tapes. I didn't think of the Gargoyles as 'demonic forces', though; the script seemed to me to say that our idea of demons is based on sightings of them.  I also doubt that they would be able to conquer humanity, since only the winged ones are able to breed, and even if the females lay thousands of eggs at a time, we outnumber them millions to one.  Plus there's that reeeeally long incubation period. 

Cheers, 

Sandra


June 17, 2015

[re: The Mouse And His Child]

I just read your review of that film and can empathize with your tale of being haunted by it because of your encounter with it as a child. Not because I saw the film as a child but because of the book which it was based on. I suspect it might come closer to justifying the real estate the film version has taken up in your brain all those many years if you ever wanted to check it out.

At any rate, I read The Mouse and His Child back in middle school and still not only recall portions of the book but the actual reading of it. I may have read it once or twice in the decades since but particular sequences are almost certainly permanently etched into my brain and from the first time I read it no less

The dog food label for one. That had a much larger role in the book than in the film with much of it being a deep explanation of the religious movement that sprang up based around "The Last Visible Dog". The Mouse and His Child has been described as the only children's book which doubles as a treatise on existential philosophy and the film doesn't particularly do a good job of carrying that across. Manny's ultimate fate was the same in each version but the book made it quite obvious how hellish he would consider that fate while the film doesn't really set up the character that way. The shrew armies are another instance that didn't come across as well because they were portrayed as borderline comic relief rather than the murderous lunatics of the book.

As for the other moment you mention burning into your brain, I would hazard a guess that it was either "PEANUT BRITTLE!" or the parts harvesting. The former was more violent than I recall the book sequence being while the latter actually managed to be less.

Michael Stakely


June 8, 2015

[re: The Naked Face]

"Can you name a non-Bond movie [Roger Moore] appeared in while doing James Bond?"

Ffolkes, aka North  Sea Hijack aka Assault Force, in 1979. A very underrated film, I think.

Brandi Weed

Yes, I guess I should have included that movie. Though I'm pretty sure the rest of Roger Moore's non-Bond movies made during his Bond period are pretty unknown to most people.


June 7, 2015

Howdydo, and thanks for giving The Angry Red Planet a fair shake.  More Flash Gordon than Gravity, but they still got some things right.  First-time scripter Sid Pink knocked out the initial draft in 5 days with no pre-formed idea of how it would conclude. Naura Hayden, under contract to Pink, suggested that adding scientific elements might make it more credible. Sci-Fi guy Ib Melchior, who recently passed @ age 97, offered a free rewrite if allowed to direct.    

Pink admitted that the 'Cinemagic' gimmick  didn't work out as expected.  Developed by comics artist Norman Maurer, who also designed the Martian aliens and landscapes, the process intended to make actors appear as a live-action comic.  (Freeze any Mars scene, and it DOES kinda look like a comic.)  Test stills convinced them that it would work.  Regrettably, when filmed it looked like what it was:  B-movie types going thru the motions while trying not to embarass themselves.

Cinematographer Stanley Cortez (Night of the Hunter), unhappy with being shut out of indie productions due to his rep of being slow and tempermental, offered to work for union scale.  (The entire crew, as well as fading Bogart clone Gerald Mohr, also worked @ union scale.)

Mike Mueller


June 1, 2015

[re: I.Q.]

I recall seeing this when it was in the theatres.  The bit I remember best is Einstein asking Fry's psychologist character "How are the rats?"  Fry:  "I've switched to experimenting on the students." E says, "My God, the mazes must be HUGE."

My favorite two stories about Einstein are probably apocryphal, but fun:
 
1. Somebody noticed that Monday to Friday a little girl would enter Einstein's house shortly after school let out, stay a few minutes, then leave.  Asked what that was about, Einstein explained, "I do her mathematics homework and she gives me the cookies from her lunchbox.";-)
 
2. This one comes from Shelley Winters' first autobiography, Sheila or Sharon or whatever ( I can't remember) Called Shelley, so it has to be taken with a grain of salt.  Shelley never let the truth get in the way of a good story:

When Shelley and Marilyn Monroe were starlets, they were room mates.  One night, after Shelley had just broken up with Burt Lancaster and Marilyn with whoever she was seeing, the two of them, presumably after a few drinks, said "Why can't we just be like men and make notches on the bedpost?  Why do we always get involved ?"  So they decided to make a list of all the men they'd like to boink.  First name on Marilyn's list was Albert Einstein.
 
    Shelley :  Isn't he kind of .... old ?
 
    Marilyn:  Yes, but I hear he's really healthy.
 
Several years later, after the two of them had made the bigtime, Shelley noticed a framed photograph of Einstein on Marilyn's mantelpiece, with the inscription To Marilyn, with gratitude. :-D 

Sandra


May 13, 2015

[re: Sword Of The Valiant]

I'm surprised to learn that someone made a movie based on Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, a medieval poem  written by someone who was not Chaucer.  I believe the same individual also wrote The Pearl, in which the narrator, mourning the death of his baby daughter, has a vision of her as a heavenly maiden, dressed in white, and asks, poignantly ; "Art thou my pearl, that I have plaint?"
 
Well, enough about that. 

One thing that always irritates me in historicals is when the interiors are brightly lit.  "Where's the light coming from?" I yell.  Fireplaces and candles don't produce all that much light, particularly if the room is large.  If you have watched Wolf Hall, for instance, it's dark once night falls.  If you have ever tried to read or sew or whatever by candlelight, its a good way to go blind.
   
If the movie ever shows up on tv, I might watch, just because of the connection to the poem, but I won't have any expectations. 

Sandra


May 7, 2015

[re: The Legend Of Black Thunder Mountain]

Greywizard:
      
Hello, I read your critique of the movie and I was smiling when I came across the part about the crazy old mountain man (Glen Porter). That man was my father and I remember visiting the set and meeting Bozo and feeding her marshmallows, and looking at all the animals. My dad stopped acting due he had three kids and it was real hard back than to find work if you did not know the right people. Thank you for writing about this movie - it was not a flattering review but you talked about it so thank you.
 
Very respectfully,

Jake Porter (Son of the Crazy Mountain man)


May 7, 2015

Hello,

I read your review of Scarface Killer and thought you might like to know that The Cop In Blue Jeans also starring Jack Palance is out on dvd on The Swingin' Seventies 50 movie pack from Mill Creek.  Both of these movies are in the collection.  I hope this is of interest to you.

Glen


May 4, 2015

I've been a fan of your site for quite a while and I just wanted to say that I really admire the work you put into every review. I'll admit, it also saves me from being very bored at my job!

I do have one film suggestion as well.

The Meateater, a very low budget horror movie from 1979. It's basically about a horribly burned guy living in an abandoned movie theater who starts killing people (or at least tries to scare them off) when a family buys it.. The acting isn't very good, a standout being a scene where an old man is asked if he wants something and replies by repeating "No" while slowly shaking his head while the camera zooms in on his face. It's a rather surreal experience, to say the least.

Again, love your site. Keep up the amazing work!

Alissa


January 30, 2015

[re: The Traveling Executioner]

"Why would anyone want to be an executioner?", like "What kind of woman decides to become a guard in a men's prison?" or "What kind of person applies to become the one who picks up dead bodies and takes them to the morgue?" or "Why would a doctor spend a career looking up people's rectums?" (I asked my gastroenterologist and she pointed out that she sees things nobody else does - such as my intestinal tract) - is one of those questions with no answer except, "People are weird. "  

Sandra

You are probably right.


January 20, 2015

Hi, big fan of your site. Also I'm a big fan of weird animated films, and they don't get much weirder than The Elm-Chanted Forest. Made in Croatia(!), this is the story of the painter aptly named Peter Palette. He can speak to the animals (like Dr. Dolittle on LSD). There's a bad guy who's a total prick (in more ways than one) but the man (mushroom?) who really steals the show is the more-than-borderline-offensive Magic Michael Mushroom (kinda Sambo/mushroom/Michael Jackson). I'm leaving SOOOOO much out. I've had 3 copies of this flick in my 30 years of life. It's like a bad penny (I got the latest copy in the bargain bin of a thrift shop I go to, lost it in my closet, AND FOUND IT DURING SPRING CLEANING!!!). I think you could find a VHS on Ebay or maybe some cheapie company has put it on DVD. Hope you find it Happy Trails!

genan2000

I'm always up for a bizarre animated movie, so I'll definitely keep an eye out for this one. Thanks for the suggestion!


November 16, 2014

I just read your review of Bloody Birthday. I can't say I'd ever heard of it before. Have you ever seen Peopletoys aka Devil Times Five? As you might guess from the title, it features five killer kids, which is probably some sort of record!

For every child actor like Peter Ostrum (he played Charlie Bucket in Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, was offered a 3-picture deal, decided the life of a child actor wasn't for him, went home and became a veterinarian) there's a Bobby Driscoll (he played Jim Hawkins in Treasure Island, among other roles, became a junkie when he grew up, was found dead in an abandoned house, and his body wasn't even identified until after he had been buried in a potter's field).  

Sandra

Yes, I've seen Devil Times Five. I thought it was disappointing for the most part, with its annoying adult and children characters, and it unfolded with no surprise or tension. Hard to believe someone thought it was worth issuing on DVD twice!


September 5, 2014

Greetings,

Just happened to find your site via the recent review of Death Riders.

I live in Champaign, IL, just an hour away from Danville where the thrill show was based in its heyday. I have been noodling around for info about it for a couple of years now. Coincidentally, I finally watched the doc for the first time last week.

The Death Riders provided stunt work for a narrative feature that came out a year after this, Death Driver, produced by the southern B-film maker Earl Owensby (Wolfman, Rottweiler).

I recently picked up an original program for the stunt show off of eBay, and it was sent and autographed by none other than Floyd Reed, Sr., the founder of the show. He included a note saying that other DR memorabilia would be offered. The program gives a better idea than the doc about the structure of their shows. (You do see their announcer hawing them once or twice in the doc.) I didn't grow up here so their history is news to me.

I do agree with the lack of "human interest" material in the doc. The voice overs from the team were probably only a small portion of interviews that were recorded.

Thought you'd be interested!

Keep up the review work, I'll have to look around your site more.

Jason Pankoke


September 1, 2014

Hello,

It occured to me as I was reading your review for Starchaser that've I've been reading your work for years now and I have never told you how much I enjoy it.

This email was sent to rectify that.

Keep up the excellent work.

The Wit and Weirdness of Al Bruno III
http://albruno3.blogspot.com


August 31, 2014

Hello,


I just read your review of Running Delilah this morning and agree with you one hundred percent. My wife and I watched it last night, and I said to her, after Delilah learns to cope with her new body, "Steve Austin and Jaime Sommers had more anguish than her!"

I noticed that, really, most of what she accomplished in the final confrontation could have been handled by ANY agent.

We only watched this movie as it came on a DVD set - Movies for the Man Cave - which I purchased solely because of a William Shatner/Andy Griffith made-for-TV movie (which is pretty good) called Pray for the Wildcats.

I enjoy a lot of the old made-for-TV movies of the 60s and 70s, but often the only way to find them is to buy a collection of crap!  Fortunately, these DVDs are usually pretty cheap.

Last week I found the excellent made-for-TV film I will Fight No More Forever about Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce, starring  Ned Romero, Sam Elliot and James Whitmore. That one came in a collection of 1940s John Wayne westerns!

Have a great day.

Richard S. Drake


August 28, 2014

[re: Eye Of The Eagle 3]

Hey, read your review, nice to see you enjoy a Santiago film, though I have to disagree with on the majority of depictions of Vietnam vets in films being negative, I think most portrayals have been fairly positive as while the characters situations don't as a whole typically start out not so great, they more often then not end up better by the end of the film and they generally aren't portrayed as bad people (I don't think they're usually portrayed as a "losers" either, i'd say "outcast" is a better term), and the unfortunate thing is that the portrayals are really not all that inaccurate (I wouldn't call them "unfair" either), a lot of vets did fall on pretty hard times after returning from the war (some because they felt betrayed at having been forced into an unnecessary war), one of the most tragic depictions of a vet I've seen in a movie is in Operation Nam (the ending is especially downbeat).

Michael Prymula


July 16, 2014

[re: Your Three Minutes Are Up]

I saw this for this for the first and only time on uk tv on 10/05/1982. It was never transmitted again. I was only 12 yrs old at the time and I really enjoyed the movie. It's a real hidden gem.

I too have an interest in unknown films although my bias is more uk ones- and I've watched more than most. Luckily, one of my work colleagues shares my interest and i never thought I would see the day when someone would say "Yes, I've watched The Liberation Of LB Jones" (that's one for your list!)

Regards,

T ALI


June 30, 2014

[re: The Gong Show Movie]

I saw it late one night on one of the Showtime channels and I was just stunned.  I was born in 1975 so I'm too young to have seen the show when it originally aired.    IMO, it's sort of like what Ed Wood might have been like if Burton had focused on Wood's post-Lugosi decline into alcohol and soft-core porn movies and novels.    I think the whole Gong Show itself was like some kind of bizarre missing link between Ed Wood and "reality TV."
 
Jason Kreitzer


April 21, 2014

[re: Tweety's High-Flying Adventure]

Hello: I just happen to be searching the internet when your review of this cartoon movie shows up. In your review, you noticed the background design...which pleased me, because I was the background designer. You "got" what we were trying to accomplish. Thank you.

B. Chin


April 21, 2014

I have another film that you may want to review. Fever is a 1988 Australian thriller/neo noir starring Bill Hunter, Mary Regan, Gary Sweet and Jim Holt. A police sergeant, his duplicitous younger wife, her trivial lover and a police constable vie for a suitcase of drug dealer's cash. You may be able to obtain a copy on video.

Good on you for your review of Rituals. I enjoy it, too.

Take care,

Ben Saddington.


April 19, 2014

I haven't seen Bandidos, and probably never will, but I have seen a fair number of spaghetti westerns, so am tolerably familiar with the genre.  I'm not good at remembering titles, though.  For instance, there was one with John Philip Law; when he was a small boy his father was murdered by five (I think) men and the house set on fire.  He tracks them down, aided by the fact that, although he doesn't know their names, or why they killed his dad, each of them had something distinctive that identifies him, like a scar or a tattoo.  He hooks up with Lee Van Cleef, who, of course, turns out to be one of them.  When Law is all set to kill him, he asks "How did you get out of that burning house?"  Then Law remembers Van Cleef carried him out; otherwise he wouldn't be alive to seek vengeance.  I can't remember if he kills him or not.
 
I found it funny that Hollywood soon started making imitation Spaghetti Westerns, like Hang Em High and Two Mules For Sister Sarah.  An imitation of an imitation!  I recall reading an interview with an old director - I think it was John Ford - who was asked what he thought of SW (I refuse to type the whole phrase again).  He thought the interviewer was kidding.  Assured that they were real, he asked what they were like.  "They're very long, they don't have any plot and they are incredibly bloody and violent." is the reply.  Yeah, well, Hollywood may have thought the western was about bringing law and order to a lawless land, but the Italians thought it was about indescriminate killing.
    
As for Bandido, it's a pity one of the characters is named "Richard Martin" and another one "Ricky", because now a loop of La Vida Loca is playing in my head. "Ricky Shot"?  Wouldn't "Ricky Shay" have been a better name?
 
The villain murdering everyone (except Martin) he just robbed ought to be enough to qualify him for Total Villainy without him having to do anything more.  Incidentally, I have seen that slow pan across the dead bodies in other Pasta Pics.  I would have thought it as common as the extreme closeups in which you can count the pores in peoples' noses and the twangy Morricone style music. 

Sandra

The John Phillip Law/Lee Van Cleef spaghetti western you were thinking of is Death Rides A Horse, which is a pretty good movie. It's in the public domain, so it would be pretty easy to track down a copy if you wanted to.


March 17, 2014

Hey I just stumbled upon your site doing a search after having watched Cracking Up. You hit the nail on the head with that one. Although I too had one laugh during it, but unlike you it wasn't the diner sketch. It was the first sketch with the Credibility Gap. Funny to see that the director contacted you.

Also enjoyed your review of Dark Night of the Scarecrow. I remember to this day seeing that when it first aired on TV. Always stuck with me. Haven't seen it since. I'll have to revisit it.

I recently saw a film streaming on EpixHD. It's one of those 70s SoCal-set rip offs of Car Wash titled Record City. If you get the chance you should check it out. I'm not suggesting it's a good film, but it's one of those films where you stare at the screen and wonder how the hell did this get made?

Anyway looking forward to digging through your site. Keep up the good work......

Steve

Thanks for writing. I did see Record City years ago, though I've pretty much forgotten everything about it. I still own a bootleg of it, so maybe I should dig it out again.


January 30, 2014

Was reading:

http://www.k-bailey.com/unknownmovies/reviews/rev459.html

When the author said:

"If you showed Abraxas to Mike Nelson, Crow and Servo, they would vomit. No quips or jokes, just 90 minutes of listening to robots puke. Is that what you want?"

I couldn't stop laughing. Why? http://www.rifftrax.com/ondemand/abraxas

Yes, I did buy it. ;-)

Take it easy, man.

Nate Winchester


January 18, 2014

Hey, just dropping you a line to say that I've loved your site for a long time. I've always liked that you chose your movies not because they were bad, but just obscure. There is also lots of research (and follow up!). Truly a great resource. If I had one critique, it's that I've always wanted to be able to see the review dates even after they fall off the front page.

Also wanted to let you know I had a hard time finding the new site since bad movie planet apparently exploded. B-Masters Cabal still has a link to that site which seems to send you to a random link. I got porn the first time!

Anyways, thank you again.

Joel Reed Parker

Thanks for writing in. Your suggestion about the review dates is a good one. From this point on, I will add the posting dates inside the actual reviews as well.


January 14, 2014

[re: Cirio H. Santiago]

I just wanted to recommend some of his other films, I'll admit The Muthers and his other films from that same period were far from his best work (I do like some WIP films, the Caged Heat films being my faves) but I think for the most part his films are pretty well done and entertaining.

Anyways here's some films of his I think you should check out:

Naked Vengeance
The Devastator
Firecracker
Stranglehold
Raiders Of The Sun
Stryker
Dune Warriors
Fast Gun
Bloodfist 2050
Firehawk
When Eagles Strike
Silk
Silk 2
Equalizer 2000
Future Hunters
Demon Of Paradise
Wheels Of Fire
Final Mission
The Sisterhood

Michael Prymula

Thanks for the suggestions. I didn't like Firecracker (or the movie it was remade from, TNT Jackson, which Santiago also directed), and I also didn't like Strkyer (which I've reviewed on this web site) and Dune Warriors. However, I do remember liking Wheels Of Fire - I'll have to see if I can track that one down again.


January 11, 2014

Your mention that we never actually see the plane crash in Sole Survivor reminded me of another film in which we don't see it.  It's an Australian film called The Survivor, starring Robert Powell.  A  plane crashes just after takeoff, and the pilot alone survives.  It too, bears a certain similarity to Carnival of Souls, though it is based on a novel by James Herbert, who for all I know may have seen CofS, or perhaps that Twilight Zone episode with Inger Stevens.  By the way, I wanted to see CofS ever since I first heard of it, and finally got my chance recently. Thank goodness for cable tv, eh ? 

Sandra


BACK to main page